Bad steroid injection

Primarily talk to us about it before choosing a treatment for your CTS. Try to find out as much as possible about the injection to which you reacted. These injections contain different steroids, varying or no local anaesthetic and other chemicals such as stabilisers and preservatives. For example, the commercial preparation 'Kenalog' used in this area contains not only the steroid (Triamcinolone acetate), but also sodium chloride, benzyl alcohol, carboxymethylcellulose sodium, polysorbate 80 and either sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid used to balance the pH (acidity). You may have had an allergic reaction to one of the other components of the injection or you may have reacted to one of the synthetic steroids which are not native to the human body. It does not necessarily follow that you would also react to a different preparation so knowing exactly which preparation you have had a reaction to is a vital piece of information.

Steroid injection has been around since the early 1950s, and it remains a primary treatment for general practitioners all the way to orthopedic surgeons. Why? First of all, it offers the hope of quick relief. Second, it’s a Big Fat Cash Cow. Let’s do the math. Say you have sciatica, and you go to see Dr. Prick Butt and he says, “Not much I can do for you other than give you a steroid injection. Of course, it may take up to three of these to achieve the best results.” Three injections @ $150 per injection = $450. Now, taking into account that the average orthopedist probably sees at least 20 patients a day and works 180 days a year, that comes to 3,600 patients. If 20 percent of those patients get three steroid injections, that’s an annual income of $324,000 ($450 X 750 patients). That’s for 10 minutes of work per patient. And you wonder why things haven’t changed in more than 50 years.

I had three injections all of which worked for a few days to two weeks then stopped. The excruciating pain returned and only Vicoden 5 mg 3-4 times a day controlled the pain. Vicoden at that dose is the lowest dose prescribed. it worked perfectly for several years and doctors refused to prescribed opioids for fear of losing their license. My sister recently died of throat cancer and she complained constantly of pain. She died with unrelieved pain. As a cancer patient she was prescribed Morphine 2 mg. every 6 hours. That is beyond ridiculous but keeps our doctor’s license safe. Our doctors are violating their Hippocratic oath – Do No Harm. They had added a caveat “except when the government is breathing down your neck. Then the patient be damned. I am glad this helped you Randy. I don’t know your clinical status but I am sure it differs from mine. Do you have severe and crippling arthritis?

Q. Had FMS for almost twenty years now, tried almost everything. Is Lyrica in the "steroid" family? Any one in this community could help me? I have given my few questions to find out an answer. I Had FMS for almost twenty years now, tried almost everything. I'm considering Lyrica but I'd like more info. Is Lyrica in the "steroid" family? If you go on Lyrica for a while & see no improvement with pain, is going off of it a big deal like with other med's, or can you simply just stop taking it? I take Ambien, will that have any interactions? I'm seeing my Doc about this at the end of the month, but I was hoping to get some personal experiences about it. Thanks for any thoughts! Thanks for your answers, keep them coming! A. according to this-
http:///drug_
there is a moderate interaction. that means you can take them both but be checked regularly for depression of breath.

Bad steroid injection

bad steroid injection

Q. Had FMS for almost twenty years now, tried almost everything. Is Lyrica in the "steroid" family? Any one in this community could help me? I have given my few questions to find out an answer. I Had FMS for almost twenty years now, tried almost everything. I'm considering Lyrica but I'd like more info. Is Lyrica in the "steroid" family? If you go on Lyrica for a while & see no improvement with pain, is going off of it a big deal like with other med's, or can you simply just stop taking it? I take Ambien, will that have any interactions? I'm seeing my Doc about this at the end of the month, but I was hoping to get some personal experiences about it. Thanks for any thoughts! Thanks for your answers, keep them coming! A. according to this-
http:///drug_
there is a moderate interaction. that means you can take them both but be checked regularly for depression of breath.

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