Overuse of steroid nasal spray

Mortuaire, G., de Gabory, L., François, M., Massé, G., Bloch, F., Brion, N., ... Serrano, E. Rebound congestion and rhinitis medicamentosa: Nasal decongestants in clinical practice. (2013, June 1). Critical review of the literature by a medical panel. European Annals of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Diseases , 130(3), 137-144. Retrieved from https:///#!/content/playContent/1--S1879729612001378?returnurl=http:%2F%%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS1879729612001378%3Fshowall%3Dtrue&referrer=https:%2F%2F .

Sinus infections, the cause of untold misery, strike about 37 million people in the . each year.

On the surface of things, the cause of sinus trouble is clear. Teeny holes that connect your nasal passages to your sinuses (basically a collection of hollow, moist cavities that lurk beneath your nose, eyes, and cheeks) get blocked. Then gunk builds up in your sinuses, germs may grow, and you feel, well, hideous.

But the cause of the blockage is sometimes trickier to figure out. Here are 13 things that can cause an acute sinus infection (the most common type) and, in some cases, lead to a chronic sinus infection.

Nasal congestion is commonly caused by allergic rhinitis, or hay fever. This occurs when pollen, dust, mold spores, or other allergens are inhaled and irritate the nasal passage. Other causes of nasal congestion include the common cold or flu, a deviated septum, sinusitis or sinus infections, reaction to certain medications. Additionally, nasal congestion occurs in many women during pregnancy. In many individuals, nasal congestion is caused by food allergies. Those who are lactose intolerant often find themselves suffering from a stuffy nose. Your doctor can conduct allergy tests to identify your specific type of food allergy and recommend a new diet. Reducing the amount of dairy in your diet in addition to carbohydrates and sugar can improve the quality of your diet and reduce nasal congestion.

4. Antibiotics may help — but only if you have a bacterial infection. Most of the time, the drugs are warranted only when acute bacterial sinusitis causes severe symptoms. For instance, a young child with high fever should receive an antibiotic promptly because the infection can spread to the eyes or brain. But most mild sinus infections get better within a week on their own; antibiotics may speed recovery by just a day or so. Thus, experts are increasingly encouraging “watchful waiting.” For mild bacterial sinusitis, Dr. Rosenfeld often writes a prescription for antibiotics but asks patients to hold off on filling it for seven days to see whether symptoms improve without treatment. If not, or if patients start feeling worse, they can start the antibiotics.

Overuse of steroid nasal spray

overuse of steroid nasal spray

4. Antibiotics may help — but only if you have a bacterial infection. Most of the time, the drugs are warranted only when acute bacterial sinusitis causes severe symptoms. For instance, a young child with high fever should receive an antibiotic promptly because the infection can spread to the eyes or brain. But most mild sinus infections get better within a week on their own; antibiotics may speed recovery by just a day or so. Thus, experts are increasingly encouraging “watchful waiting.” For mild bacterial sinusitis, Dr. Rosenfeld often writes a prescription for antibiotics but asks patients to hold off on filling it for seven days to see whether symptoms improve without treatment. If not, or if patients start feeling worse, they can start the antibiotics.

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