Systemic corticosteroids examples

Greenspun, Bertram. "Systemic Lupus Erythematosus." eMedicine . Eds. Martin K. Childers, et al. 23 Apr. 2009. Medscape. 21 Jul. 2009 <http:///article/305578-overview>. Hahn, Bevrah, and Betty P. Tsao. "Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Related Syndromes." Kelley's Textbook of Rheumatology. Eds. Edward Harris, et al. 7th ed. Philadelphia: . Saunders, 2005. MD Consult . Elsevier, Inc. 21 Jul. 2009 <http://>. Sjowali, Christopher, et al. "Serum Levels of Autoantibodies Against Monomeric C-Reactive Protein Are Correlated with Disease Activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus." Arthritis Research & Therapy 6 2 (2004): 87-94. Medscape Today . Medscape. 21 Jul. 2009 <http:///viewarticle/466990>. Source: Medical Disability Advisor

Through the first two years, the visual acuity remained about the same in the two groups ( results published in 2011). At seven years, visual acuity on average remained stable in the systemic group but declined about six letters in the implant group. The researchers found that implant-treated eyes had reactivations of uveitis after about five years, which coincided with a decline in visual acuity. The loss of vision in the implant group appears to have been due to increased damage in the retina and choroid (a tissue rich in blood vessels lying underneath the retina). 

Patients requiring oral corticosteroids should be weaned slowly from systemic corticosteroid use after transferring to PULMICORT RESPULES (budesonide inhalation suspension) . Initially, PULMICORT RESPULES should be used concurrently with the patient's usual maintenance dose of systemic corticosteroid. After approximately one week, gradual withdrawal of the systemic corticosteroid may be initiated by reducing the daily or alternate daily dose. Further incremental reductions may be made after an interval of one or two weeks, depending on the response of the patient. Generally, these decrements should not exceed 25% of the prednisone dose or its equivalent. A slow rate of withdrawal is strongly recommended.

Certain drugs such as troleandomycin (TAO), erythromycin ( Ery-Tab , EryPed 200), and clarithromycin ( Biaxin ) and ketoconazole ( Nizoral ) can reduce the ability of the liver to metabolize (breakdown) corticosteroids and this may lead to an increase in the levels and side effects of corticosteroids in the body. On the other hand, phenobarbital, ephedrine , phenytoin ( Dilantin ), and rifampin ( Rifadin , Rimactane ) may reduce the blood levels of corticosteroids by increasing the breakdown of corticosteroids by the liver. This may necessitate an increase of corticosteroid dose when they are used in combination with these drugs.

Asthma is a complex disease of the respiratory tract associated with chronic inflammation in which an intricate network of cells and cellular factors plays a major role. Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases, with an estimated 300 million cases worldwide, imposing a considerable burden on society in morbidity, quality of life, and healthcare costs. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) form the gold standard, first-line therapy in the effective management of persistent asthma and reduce morbidity and mortality from asthma. However, long-term use of high-dose ICS therapy has potential to cause systemic side effects-impaired growth in children, decreased bone mineral density, skin thinning and bruising, and cataracts. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis suppression, measured by serum or urine cortisol decrease, correlates with the occurrence of systemic side effects of high-dose ICSs. Therefore, cortisol may be a relevant surrogate marker to identify the potential for adverse effects from ICS therapy. Ciclesonide is a new generation ICS with demonstrable safety and efficacy in the treatment of asthma. The unique pharmacologic characteristics of ciclesonide, such as reduced local adverse effects, lack of cortisol suppression, and the option for once-daily dosing, may improve compliance with therapy and allow long-term use of ICSs without fear of systemic adverse effects.

Corticosteroids are more potent than NSAIDs in reducing inflammation and restoring function when the disease is active. Corticosteroids are particularly helpful when internal organs are affected. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, injected directly into the joints and other tissues, or administered intravenously. Unfortunately, corticosteroids have serious side effects when given in high doses over prolonged periods, and the doctor will try to monitor the activity of the disease in order to use the lowest doses that are safe. Side effects of corticosteroids include weight gain , thinning of the bones and skin, infection, diabetes , facial puffiness, cataracts , and death (necrosis) of the tissues in large joints.

Systemic corticosteroids examples

systemic corticosteroids examples

Certain drugs such as troleandomycin (TAO), erythromycin ( Ery-Tab , EryPed 200), and clarithromycin ( Biaxin ) and ketoconazole ( Nizoral ) can reduce the ability of the liver to metabolize (breakdown) corticosteroids and this may lead to an increase in the levels and side effects of corticosteroids in the body. On the other hand, phenobarbital, ephedrine , phenytoin ( Dilantin ), and rifampin ( Rifadin , Rimactane ) may reduce the blood levels of corticosteroids by increasing the breakdown of corticosteroids by the liver. This may necessitate an increase of corticosteroid dose when they are used in combination with these drugs.

Media:

systemic corticosteroids examplessystemic corticosteroids examplessystemic corticosteroids examplessystemic corticosteroids examplessystemic corticosteroids examples

http://buy-steroids.org